Historic Royal Palaces, Tower of London

Working with Historic Royal Palaces and English Heritage, the practice has been responsible for a number of conservation projects at the Tower, the most important work of military architecture in England. The work at this World Heritage Site has included stonework conservation to the 12th-century south curtain wall; stone and timber repairs to the late-13th century Byward Tower at the south-west corner next to the moat, the main gatehouse of the outer ward; and a new conical lead roof to the massive, cylindrical Wakefield Tower, built in the 13th century to command the water gate to the river. The project was a finalist in the RICS Conservation Awards, London Region 2005.

Working with Historic Royal Palaces and English Heritage, the practice has been responsible for a number of conservation projects at the Tower, the most important work of military architecture in England. The work at this World Heritage Site has included stonework conservation to the 12th-century south curtain wall; stone and timber repairs to the late-13th century Byward Tower at the south-west corner next to the moat, the main gatehouse of the outer ward; and a new conical lead roof to the massive, cylindrical Wakefield Tower, built in the 13th century to command the water gate to the river. The project was a finalist in the RICS Conservation Awards, London Region 2005.

Working with Historic Royal Palaces and English Heritage, the practice has been responsible for a number of conservation projects at the Tower, the most important work of military architecture in England. The work at this World Heritage Site has included stonework conservation to the 12th-century south curtain wall; stone and timber repairs to the late-13th century Byward Tower at the south-west corner next to the moat, the main gatehouse of the outer ward; and a new conical lead roof to the massive, cylindrical Wakefield Tower, built in the 13th century to command the water gate to the river. The project was a finalist in the RICS Conservation Awards, London Region 2005.

Working with Historic Royal Palaces and English Heritage, the practice has been responsible for a number of conservation projects at the Tower, the most important work of military architecture in England. The work at this World Heritage Site has included stonework conservation to the 12th-century south curtain wall; stone and timber repairs to the late-13th century Byward Tower at the south-west corner next to the moat, the main gatehouse of the outer ward; and a new conical lead roof to the massive, cylindrical Wakefield Tower, built in the 13th century to command the water gate to the river. The project was a finalist in the RICS Conservation Awards, London Region 2005.

Working with Historic Royal Palaces and English Heritage, the practice has been responsible for a number of conservation projects at the Tower, the most important work of military architecture in England. The work at this World Heritage Site has included stonework conservation to the 12th-century south curtain wall; stone and timber repairs to the late-13th century Byward Tower at the south-west corner next to the moat, the main gatehouse of the outer ward; and a new conical lead roof to the massive, cylindrical Wakefield Tower, built in the 13th century to command the water gate to the river. The project was a finalist in the RICS Conservation Awards, London Region 2005.

Working with Historic Royal Palaces and English Heritage, the practice has been responsible for a number of conservation projects at the Tower, the most important work of military architecture in England. The work at this World Heritage Site has included stonework conservation to the 12th-century south curtain wall; stone and timber repairs to the late-13th century Byward Tower at the south-west corner next to the moat, the main gatehouse of the outer ward; and a new conical lead roof to the massive, cylindrical Wakefield Tower, built in the 13th century to command the water gate to the river. The project was a finalist in the RICS Conservation Awards, London Region 2005.

Working with Historic Royal Palaces and English Heritage, the practice has been responsible for a number of conservation projects at the Tower, the most important work of military architecture in England. The work at this World Heritage Site has included stonework conservation to the 12th-century south curtain wall; stone and timber repairs to the late-13th century Byward Tower at the south-west corner next to the moat, the main gatehouse of the outer ward; and a new conical lead roof to the massive, cylindrical Wakefield Tower, built in the 13th century to command the water gate to the river. The project was a finalist in the RICS Conservation Awards, London Region 2005.

Working with Historic Royal Palaces and English Heritage, the practice has been responsible for a number of conservation projects at the Tower, the most important work of military architecture in England. The work at this World Heritage Site has included stonework conservation to the 12th-century south curtain wall; stone and timber repairs to the late-13th century Byward Tower at the south-west corner next to the moat, the main gatehouse of the outer ward; and a new conical lead roof to the massive, cylindrical Wakefield Tower, built in the 13th century to command the water gate to the river. The project was a finalist in the RICS Conservation Awards, London Region 2005.