The Waterlily House and Aroid House, Kew

The Waterlily House designed by Richard Turner in 1852 and the Aroid House by John Nash (now known as the Nash Conservatory), comprise 2 of Kew’s elegant listed glasshouses which have been carefully conserved by the practice to provide ongoing use as a functioning conservatory in the case of the Waterlily House, while the Nash Conservatory has found a new use as an education and exhibition centre.

The Waterlily House designed by Richard Turner in 1852 and the Aroid House by John Nash (now known as the Nash Conservatory), comprise 2 of Kew’s elegant listed glasshouses which have been carefully conserved by the practice to provide ongoing use as a functioning conservatory in the case of the Waterlily House, while the Nash Conservatory has found a new use as an education and exhibition centre.

In the 1960’s an aluminium support structure had been installed in the Waterlily House to overcome structural deterioration. This was removed and the original iron construction repaired exposing the fine structural pattern of the original design. The original ponds, slate planting beds and external fabric have all been conserved and restored to provide a background for the planting of the Waterlilies and Gourds which are displayed in the space.

The Nash Conservatory was originally 1 of 2 identical glasshouses built at Buckingham Palace. William IV moved this one to Kew in 1836 where it was used to house various planting functions. After a period of disuse arising partly as a result of deterioration of the existing stonework, the building has now been conserved and serviced to provide a flexible, elegant and multipurpose interior.