No 1 Museum, Kew

The Number 1. Museum occupies a central position in the Royal Botanic Gardens opposite the Palm House and receives more than 300,000 visitors each year. It was designed by Decimus Burton in 1848 and is listed grade 2*

It houses part of the Gardens’ economic botany collection, with exhibits displayed in purpose-built cabinets on the ground floor, and the Gardens’ School of Horticulture Education facilities on the upper floors.

A major project was undertaken, benefiting from a Heritage Lottery Fund Grant, to conserve the fabric of the building, insert a new accessible lift and staircase and fully update the buildings services.

The refurbishment has transformed the building giving it a new life as the central education centre on the site with provision for visiting students and school children as well as general teaching and administration space.

The Number 1. Museum occupies a central position in the Royal Botanic Gardens opposite the Palm House and receives more than 300,000 visitors each year. It was designed by Decimus Burton in 1848 and is listed grade 2*

It houses part of the Gardens’ economic botany collection, with exhibits displayed in purpose-built cabinets on the ground floor, and the Gardens’ School of Horticulture Education facilities on the upper floors.

A major project was undertaken, benefiting from a Heritage Lottery Fund Grant, to conserve the fabric of the building, insert a new accessible lift and staircase and fully update the buildings services.

The refurbishment has transformed the building giving it a new life as the central education centre on the site with provision for visiting students and school children as well as general teaching and administration space.

The Number 1. Museum occupies a central position in the Royal Botanic Gardens opposite the Palm House and receives more than 300,000 visitors each year. It was designed by Decimus Burton in 1848 and is listed grade 2*

It houses part of the Gardens’ economic botany collection, with exhibits displayed in purpose-built cabinets on the ground floor, and the Gardens’ School of Horticulture Education facilities on the upper floors.

A major project was undertaken, benefiting from a Heritage Lottery Fund Grant, to conserve the fabric of the building, insert a new accessible lift and staircase and fully update the buildings services.

The refurbishment has transformed the building giving it a new life as the central education centre on the site with provision for visiting students and school children as well as general teaching and administration space.

The Number 1. Museum occupies a central position in the Royal Botanic Gardens opposite the Palm House and receives more than 300,000 visitors each year. It was designed by Decimus Burton in 1848 and is listed grade 2*

It houses part of the Gardens’ economic botany collection, with exhibits displayed in purpose-built cabinets on the ground floor, and the Gardens’ School of Horticulture Education facilities on the upper floors.

A major project was undertaken, benefiting from a Heritage Lottery Fund Grant, to conserve the fabric of the building, insert a new accessible lift and staircase and fully update the buildings services.

The refurbishment has transformed the building giving it a new life as the central education centre on the site with provision for visiting students and school children as well as general teaching and administration space.

The Number 1. Museum occupies a central position in the Royal Botanic Gardens opposite the Palm House and receives more than 300,000 visitors each year. It was designed by Decimus Burton in 1848 and is listed grade 2*

It houses part of the Gardens’ economic botany collection, with exhibits displayed in purpose-built cabinets on the ground floor, and the Gardens’ School of Horticulture Education facilities on the upper floors.

A major project was undertaken, benefiting from a Heritage Lottery Fund Grant, to conserve the fabric of the building, insert a new accessible lift and staircase and fully update the buildings services.

The refurbishment has transformed the building giving it a new life as the central education centre on the site with provision for visiting students and school children as well as general teaching and administration space.

The Number 1. Museum occupies a central position in the Royal Botanic Gardens opposite the Palm House and receives more than 300,000 visitors each year. It was designed by Decimus Burton in 1848 and is listed grade 2*

It houses part of the Gardens’ economic botany collection, with exhibits displayed in purpose-built cabinets on the ground floor, and the Gardens’ School of Horticulture Education facilities on the upper floors.

A major project was undertaken, benefiting from a Heritage Lottery Fund Grant, to conserve the fabric of the building, insert a new accessible lift and staircase and fully update the buildings services.

The refurbishment has transformed the building giving it a new life as the central education centre on the site with provision for visiting students and school children as well as general teaching and administration space.

The Number 1. Museum occupies a central position in the Royal Botanic Gardens opposite the Palm House and receives more than 300,000 visitors each year. It was designed by Decimus Burton in 1848 and is listed grade 2*

It houses part of the Gardens’ economic botany collection, with exhibits displayed in purpose-built cabinets on the ground floor, and the Gardens’ School of Horticulture Education facilities on the upper floors.

A major project was undertaken, benefiting from a Heritage Lottery Fund Grant, to conserve the fabric of the building, insert a new accessible lift and staircase and fully update the buildings services.

The refurbishment has transformed the building giving it a new life as the central education centre on the site with provision for visiting students and school children as well as general teaching and administration space.

The Number 1. Museum occupies a central position in the Royal Botanic Gardens opposite the Palm House and receives more than 300,000 visitors each year. It was designed by Decimus Burton in 1848 and is listed grade 2*

It houses part of the Gardens’ economic botany collection, with exhibits displayed in purpose-built cabinets on the ground floor, and the Gardens’ School of Horticulture Education facilities on the upper floors.

A major project was undertaken, benefiting from a Heritage Lottery Fund Grant, to conserve the fabric of the building, insert a new accessible lift and staircase and fully update the buildings services.

The refurbishment has transformed the building giving it a new life as the central education centre on the site with provision for visiting students and school children as well as general teaching and administration space.